Best Wet Tile Saws for the Money in 2020

Throwing away tile after tile because of chips and uneven cuts is frustrating. We want you to avoid wasting time, money and materials on a poor-quality wet tile saw.

We’ve reviewed 25+ wet tile saws in order to bring you our top 5 picks for quality, budget and durability.

Table of Contents

Our Picks for Best wet tile Saws

Porter-Cable PCE980 Wet Tile Saw

Best Overall

SKIL 3540-02 7-Inch Wet Tile Saw

Best Value

Dewalt D2400S 10-inch Wet Tile Saw with Stand

Best premium

What is a wet tile saw?

A wet tile saw is a specialized tool used to cut ceramic, marble, glass, and porcelain tile. It’s sort of like a cross between a miter saw and a table saw. The blade can be raised or lowered like a miter saw. But, instead of pushing the blade through the material, the material is pushed through the blade like a table saw.

Tile saws use a thin diamond-encrusted, steel blade that is rinsed with a continuous supply of water during cutting.

The flow of water protects the blade by keeping it cool during cutting. This process is twofold; water reduces friction between the blade and the tile and the water cools the blade by removing the heat. This makes it important to select a wet tile saw with an adequate water flowrate.

A budget-friendly alternative to a wet tile saw is a manual tile cutter. These work by scoring the tile, which you then break along the score. They’re smaller and more portable than a wet tile saw, but they’re really only advisable if you have a small number of tiles to cut. For larger projects, it’s better to use a wet tile saw.

Why use a wet tile saw?

Wet tile saws can make extremely smooth and accurate cuts in a variety of materials.

If you’re redoing a backsplash, tile flooring, or a bathroom, it’s probably a good idea to invest in or rent a wet tile saw. Whether you buy or rent is up to you; just remember that if you rent, you’ll want to work quickly in order to reduce the cost associated with the rental.

Many tile saws have adjustable fences that allow you to make multiple cuts without having to measure and mark each tile. This is great for jobs where you need many tiles of the same size.

Tile saws greatly reduce dust versus using other types of saws to cut tile. The water flow continuously traps and removes debris. This makes it possible to cut tiles without wearing a N95 breathing mask.

By keeping the blade cool during cutting, the water flow also prolongs the life of your diamond blade.

What features are important?

 

Blade size

The blade diameter (size) will determine the maximum thickness of tiles that you can cut. Be sure to check whether a saw uses a blade that is large enough to accommodate your tiles.

Cutting Capacity

The maximum cutting capacity of the tile saw is determined by the structure of the machine. Most saws have a maximum capacity between 12 inches and 30 inches. Keep in mind that if you’ll be doing angled cuts (say, you want to cut a tile at a 45° angle), then you’ll need to take this in to account when calculating your required cutting capacity. A saw with a 25-inch capacity can only up to an 18-inch tile at a 45° angle.

Cutting Angles

Most tile saws include an adjustable fence that allows you to cut tiles at angles. But not all tile saws are capable of producing bevel cuts. If your job requires bevel cuts, make sure to select a tile saw with this capability.

Motor strength

Saws with more horsepower will generally make quicker work of a job. A stronger motor will prevent the saw from bogging down or overheating when cutting harder tiles, such as porcelain.

Water flow rate and drainage

We’ve already discussed just how important water is when cutting tiles. Be sure to select a saw that has a great water flowrate; this pays dividends by protecting your blades and making smoother cuts.

But it’s also important to pay attention to the water management. Some saws have very small water collection pans; this results in a lot of spilled water. Worse still, some saws have fixed drain pans that require you to take the saw apart in order to drain the water.

Our favorite saws have wide pans and easily accessible drains so that you can catch most of the water and easily dispose of it during a job.

Dewalt D2400S 10-inch Wet Tile Saw with Stand

Dewalt is well-known for making great tools, and this tile saw is no exception. Liked by professionals and amateurs alike, this saw provides enough cutting power and capacity for most jobs. But all that power does come with a pretty hefty price tag; the Dewalt D2400S is the most expensive model we reviewed.

The D2400S has two adjustable water nozzles, which all you to correctly position the spray on the blade. The optional side and rear water trays capture overspray. The D2400S has much less overspray than many of the other models we reviewed. Finally, users love the stainless steel rail system which allows for precise, effortless cuts.

Pros

Cons

PORTER-CABLE PCE980 Wet Tile Saw

The Porter-Cable PCE980 Wet Tile Saw is a great overall saw, especially for the price point. The included blade is accurate. The motor is powerful enough to cut thick granite or quartz tiles. The saw has a large work surface, which might be easier for beginners to work with.

The back fence does require some adjustment out of the box. But this is quite easy thanks to the two-screw adjustment system; just use a large square to make sure the fence is perpendicular to the blade. We would have preferred an additional, adjustable fence on the side so that you could set the tile width using the fence, like with the Dewalt. Granted, the included fence on the back does have measurement markings, but these require you to carefully line up the tile with each new cut.

Overall, the Porter-Cable PCE980 is a great tile saw for its price point. It’s durable, portable and powerful.

Pros

Cons

SKIL 3540-02 7-Inch Wet Tile Saw

The SKIL 3540-02 7-Inch Wet Tile Saw is our favorite budget pick. If you’re only working on a small project like a shower or kitchen backsplash, then this saw is probably right for you. Keep in mind that it only has a smaller capacity than its near-twin, the SKIL 3540-02 7-Inch Wet Tile Saw with WaterLock Containment System; the capacity is only 12-inch by 12-inch for straight cuts or 7.75-inch diagonal cuts.

Some users do upgrade the saw blade in order to get better functionality and more accurate cuts, but, overall, we think this isn’t necessary unless you’ll be cutting harder material such as granite. If you’re cutting marble or slate, then the included blade is probably fine.

Otherwise, it’s a great saw with some minor annoyances. The fence is difficult to tighten – and it’s easy to think you’ve tightened the fence properly only to have it slip during a cut. So always make sure you’re really tightened the fence. And there is a considerable amount of overspray, so it’s best to work outdoors if you choose this saw.

Pros

Cons

SKIL 3550-02 7-Inch Wet Tile Saw with HydroLock Water Containment System

This model differs from the SKIL 3550-02 7-inch Wet Tile Saw through the inclusion of its Hydrolock Water Containment System. Most users report that this system does indeed keep water splash and overspray to a minimum, but it comes at a cost.

The containment system sits over the blade and ensures that water sprays continuously on the blade and doesn’t spray outward during cutting. Unfortunately, because the system sits over the blade, it also makes it difficult to see the blade while cutting. This makes it tough to see what you’re cutting – so you don’t know if your cuts are accurate until you stop the saw or pull the material back. Removing the water containment system results in water spraying everywhere, because the saw was not designed to function properly without the system.

That being said, most users still think the saw is a great value for the money. But if you’re going to be working outside and don’t need the water containment system, we’d suggest you opt for the cheaper SKIL 3540-02 7-Inch Wet Tile Saw without the water containment system.

Pros

Cons

Chicago Electric 2.5 Horsepower 10" Industrial Tile/Brick Saw

The Chicago Electric 2.5 Horsepower tile saw is powerful enough for almost anything you can run through it. We love the sliding rail system; it’s square, smooth and includes and adjustable side fence that makes repetitive cuts a breeze.

Unfortunately, the saw doesn’t include a blade, which means you’ll have to fork over another $20+ for a blade. But this also means that you can invest in a great, accurate blade if you want to.

While this saw claims to be industrial, many users report some durability issues. This leads us to question the accuracy of the term “industrial.” Nevertheless, this is a great quasi-industrial saw for the price. It’s powerful and easy to use.

Pros

Cons

Winners for Best wet tile Saws

Porter-Cable PCE980 Wet Tile Saw

Best Overall

SKIL 3540-02 7-Inch Wet Tile Saw

Best Value

Dewalt D2400S 10-inch Wet Wile Saw with Stand

Best premium

If you’re looking to make an investment in the best tile saw for the money, our pick is hands-down the Dewalt D24000S. It’s extremely powerful, reliable, easy to use and has the least overspray of any of the models we reviewed.

If you’re looking of a mid-range model that’s powerful enough for almost any job, our pick is the Porter-Cable PCE980. It’s durable, powerful and portable.

Finally, if you’re on a strict budget, or you’re only working on a small job, we recommend the SKIL 3540-02 (without the water containment system). While not as powerful or durable as the other saws we reviewed, it’s a great saw for its price point, and it will suffice for small jobs.